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New Organization Launched in Pittsburgh to Support Those Affected by the 2018 Synagogue Attack

Pittsburgh, PA (September 19, 2019) – A new organization has opened to serve those directly and indirectly affected by the October 27, 2018 synagogue mass shooting. The 10.27 Healing Partnership strives to provide the community access to a wide variety of services that are both victim-centered and trauma-informed.

“We hope to meet the evolving needs of the community along its journey of healing,” said Maggie Feinstein, the newly named director and long-time resident of the Squirrel Hill neighborhood where the attack occurred. “It will be a peaceful, welcoming presence to anyone feeling vulnerable or who wants support adapting to life after a trauma.”

Ms. Feinstein brings experience as a licensed professional counselor to her new role as director of the 10.27 Healing Partnership. With more than a dozen years of experience coordinating and delivering behavioral health services, she will look to foster an inclusive place for the community to gather, reflect, and connect.

The 10.27 Healing Partnership will create a therapeutic community whose activities and programs will be self-directed, encouraging individuals to engage in ways that build hope and connectivity, and ultimately foster well-being. The 10.27 Healing Partnership, located at the Jewish Community Center on Forbes Avenue, will officially open on October 2 and will maintain a robust website and convene numerous community events.

The new organization is the result of concerted efforts by those most directly impacted by the event and 10 strong partners, including federal and local government organizations and community groups coming together and meeting every week for the past 10 months. The partners include: Congregation Dor Hadash, New Light Congregation, Tree of Life * Or L’Simcha Congregation, Center for Victims, the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, Jewish Family & Community Services, the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, the City of Pittsburgh, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the United States Attorney’s Office.

Leaders of the new organization visited and convened meetings with other communities across the country that have been victims of mass shootings to learn from their experiences.

“The idea that the community is leading the development of this center is unique,” said Feinstein. “My family has lived here for three generations and now I am raising my children here. I am both humbled and proud of the enormous outreach of love and support from the greater Pittsburgh community and from around the world. As the center’s director, my mission will be to ensure the 10.27 Healing Partnership reflects the unique character and values of Squirrel Hill.”

Additionally, the 10.27 Healing Partnership will offer behavioral health resources, wellness classes, educational programming, and ongoing support for those who need help and those who want to help in responding to hate-induced trauma. The organization aims to become a trusted resource connecting individuals through engagement to appropriate services within the community.

The 10.27 Healing Partnership also will provide trainings and professional development opportunities.

Startup funding for the 10.27 Healing Partnership was provided by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. A grant from the Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program, an initiative of the federal Department of Justice, will support the first three years of operation.

The 10.27 Healing Partnership does not discriminate against program participants and/ or beneficiaries on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, age, sexual orientation, or gender identity in its delivery of services.
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